Getting Involved: Hatfield McCoy Historic Sites Need Your Help

Perhaps the greatest draw for Pike County, Kentucky is the legendary sites of the Hatfield McCoy Feud. These sites, which include the Hog Trail Cabin (known as the “Preacher Anse” Cabin), the McCoy Homeplace and Well, the Hatfield Cemeteries, Dils Cemetery (resting place of the McCoys), and an assortment of other sites all carry with them not only incredible history, but also great responsibility.

Devil-Anse

Recently, Pike County Tourism CVB, along with volunteers, prepared these sites for Memorial Day weekend. This was no small task, which involved not only financial investment, but also labor; weed eating, mowing, cleaning, raking, pressure washing staircases, and placing wreathes. Given the financial hardship bought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, such an investment has taken its toll on our budget, and although we remain optimistic for our local tourism industry’s recovery, we are looking for ways to keep these precious sites beautiful going forward.

This would be a perfect time for you to get involved, especially if you are a descendant of the Hatfields and/or McCoys. Pike County Tourism has always cherished our relationship with the Hatfields and McCoys, some of which have dedicated time and money to boosting tourism in our region, and keeping the feud story alive for many to experience and learn from.

How Can You Help?

In Pike County Tourism CVB’s over 27 years of service to these sites, we have never asked for help. However, given the circumstances, we are in need of help to maintain these wonderful sites.

Baby-Grave
Roseanna’s Baby’s Grave

There are three ways in which you can get involved:

Make an online donation: Click below to make a secure donation online with PayPal. A PayPal account is not required. This donation will be used to offset spending for Hatfield McCoy Feud Sites’ upkeep.

Volunteer your time: Not all donations need be monetary. Contact us by phone (606) 432-5063, or by email if you would like to arrange a time to volunteer at one of our historic sites. We would love to work with you.

Mail in a donation: Feel free to mail a check of any amount, made out to Pike County Tourism CVB, P.O. Box 1497, Pikeville, KY, 41501.

The 2020 Hatfield McCoy Historic Sites Cleanup

Thank you to all of our supporters for volunteering time and resources to this project.

Giving Back, a Message From McCoy Descendant Ron McCoy

“Cleaning our cemeteries is more than a responsibility or obligation. It is a privilege and an opportunity to honor our heritage in a tangible way.  For me, working in our cemeteries has always been a moving and personal experience. I don’t know if I’ve ever felt closer to my ancestors than when I’ve had a rake or shovel in my hand” said Ron McCoy, direct descendant of Randolph McCoy.

Each year, McCoy, along with many other descendants of both the Hatfields and the McCoys, visit Pike County, Kentucky, not only to reconnect with these historic sites, but to restore them. Without their volunteered time, upkeep of these sites would otherwise be impossible.

“Pike County’s historic cemeteries are more than just family memorials. They are cultural heritage sites,” said McCoy. “When we work together to maintain our cemeteries, we are preserving our mutual heritage as well as honoring the lives of those who came before us.”

Volunteer opportunities are available throughout the year, and are not limited to Hatfield and/or McCoy descendants, buy anyone who has a love for the history.

“Volunteer participation and support is vital in maintaining and conserving our cemeteries. Most cemeteries in Pike County are privately held and therefore are not supported by public funds. They are maintained through the efforts of hard-working volunteers who offer their time, labor and money to ensure that our cemeteries are preserved for future generations. “  

Pikeville-Pike County Visitors Guide

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Pikeville-Pike County, Kentucky is one of Kentucky’s most beautiful and interesting destinations. Home to the feuding Hatfields and McCoys, visitors can explore the historic feud sites from this storied past, while taking in breathtaking views and tasting some of our region’s unique flavors.

The Pikeville-Pike County Kentucky Visitors Guide includes details on Pike County attractions, annual events and lodging, and is the perfect first step to planning your trip.

Pikeville Pike County Kentucky Gallery

Photoblog: Hillbilly Days of Yesteryear

Pikeville Hillbilly Days is one of Kentucky’s most attended festivals, being one of the state’s first festivals of the (mostly) warm months of the year. Hillbilly Days is known for its outlandish character, wide assortment of vendor booths, and charm that has endured for over 40 years. Most importantly, Hillbilly Days is also a fundraiser for the Shriners Hospital for Children in Lexington, Kentucky, a hospital that serves disabled children in the Eastern Kentucky region, among many other areas.

While the COVID-19 pandemic has shut down pretty much all festivals in the state of Kentucky for the foreseeable future, it still doesn’t hurt to reminisce on the Hillbilly Days festivals of yesteryear. Let’s take a look at some photos from previous Hillbilly Days festivals.

Pikeville Hillbilly Days Gallery

Buy Hillbilly Days Merch & Support the Children’s Hospital

Despite being cancelled, Hillbilly Days 2020 merchandise is still available. Purchase collectables for the Hillbilly Days that never was by contacting Robert Adkins at 606-899-9030, or message him on facebook. Hillbilly Days Shirts are $12.00, button pins (white) are $1.00, patches, lapel pins and knives are $5.00 each. Shirts available in adult small thru 3x and youth and infant onesies. Don’t allow COVID-19 to prevent you from showing your support for the Shriners Hospital for Children.

More Hillbilly Days Resources

Wanting to keep track of the updates concerning Hillbilly Days? Follow our Pikeville Hillbilly Days facebook page, or visit www.HillbillyDays.com for updates. As of this writing, Hillbilly Days 2020 has been cancelled, and has yet to be rescheduled. However, it doesn’t hurt to check back from time to time to see if things have changed. You never know.

Pikeville Downtown Historic District Spotlight: Hotel Anthony

Our hotels are the lifeblood of our local tourism industry. They not only provide lodging for our business travelers, but also our tourists, who spend several days in our community exploring our many interesting attractions, such as the Hatfield McCoy Feud sites, our live entertainment venues, mom-and-pop shops and our beautiful outdoor locales. So we thought it would be interesting to explore one of Pikeville’s hotels from the past, Hotel Anthony.

Hotel Anthony was built between 1920 and 1925 and is located on the corner of Grace and Main Street in downtown Pikeville, Kentucky. It is featured on the National Register of Historic Places. Anthony Williams was the original owner of the hotel, which was, at the time, the only four-story brick building within the commercial historic district, and was also the tallest building in Pikeville until the First National Bank was built. Hotel Anthony was constructed with a simplistic design, and is made of enduring brick with decorative stone.

The building houses businesses until this day and is a central feature of Main Street. For better or worse, various remodeling efforts have been made to the building over the years, yet it still stands as one of Pikeville’s notable historic structures.

Pictured here is an interesting old ad for Hotel Anthony. The ad details rates as being a single for $1.25 to $2.50, with a doubles being $1.75 to $4.00. That’s a far cry from today’s prices, yet with inflation and other factors being considered, this is still quite a deal. A quick google search reveals that the average income of the early 1920’s was just over $3000 a year, with income tax dropping from a massive 77% in the mid-to-late teens, to around 25% by the time 1925 rolled around. If my math is correct, one could have purchase a double bed for a couple of hours wage. That’s not bad at all! But times have changed, and hotels feature a lot more amenities, staff, and all of the comforts we’ve come to expect, with a price to match.

The ad also highlights that Hotel Anthony offered elevator service (which is now a given for hotels), and free garage. If you look closely, the ad depicts the old drug store as being another convenience for those staying in the hotel. The great thing about exploring history is that we not only learn from the past, but we can see how things have progressed.

Click here to check out today’s amazing hotels in Pikeville, Kentucky, and plan your trip to historic downtown Pikeville!